TEAM Baruch welcomes prospective students

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Students are led on tours by TEAM Baruch members, like Andrew Armoogan (above). Photo by Brandon Paillere.

An average summer day at Baruch College consists of empty hallways and a closed cafeteria, sights that are unusual for any student to witness. The elevators, ordinarily full of students rushing to and from class or events, are vacant, except for the occasional student or two attending a summer class. On some days of the Summer session, however, the elevators miraculously become packed and congested but not due to spurs of Baruch students. The people who crowd these elevators are prospective students.

As per tradition, TEAM Baruch students have been orchestrating tours for prospective and incoming students. These students, despite resembling the Baruch undergraduates who usually crowd into the elevators during more popular academic semesters, are not officially enrolled in the college yet.

TEAM Baruch is a leadership-based organization that aims to foster meaningful relationships between students and to enhance student life at Baruch.

The organization’s acronym stands for the credo, “together everyone achieves more,” emphasizing teamwork and communication.

Orientation leaders act as guides who present Baruch to students in its best light. The tours are meant to excite prospective students, answer questions or clarify any lingering concerns.

Orientation leaders, along with other TEAM Baruch members, also work as peer mentors. The program values camaraderie between students and fosters a sense of leadership in the selected students.

As mentors, students act purposefully rather than authoritatively. The program clearly outlines the distinction between mentors and figures of authority—a mentor is someone who is more experienced but intends to pass on the knowledge that he has to other people instead of just teaching.

Generally, orientations happen during Summer and Winter sessions.

Students who stroll the halls in groups of about 30 are accompanied by orientation leaders, who show them classes in both buildings, the bookstore, the dining area, gym facilities, the Mason Hall and the Newman Library, among other sights.

Orientations also include an official advisement meeting with an academic advisor who can help break down Baruch’s curriculum.

Through these orientations, prospective students are able to tour Baruch before committing and paying the deposit. Students are also able to interact with their peers, meet some professors and get to know the structure of the campus.

Additionally, students are also highly encouraged to ask their peer mentors questions. Baruch’s academic curriculum, having raised the most concerns, seems to be one of many student concerns.

Khin San, a sophomore who doubles as an orientation leader, voiced another matter that students may have.

He stated that “a common misconception is that Baruch students are not actively involved in school since it is known as a commuter school.

However, later they do realize that many Bearcats are active in either student life, sports, theater productions and so much more.”

San detailed that orientation leaders fulfill their roles in order to help students adjust to Baruch life and “show the diverse community that Baruch offers each orientation day.”

Orientation day is also the day that students are grouped into their mandatory freshman seminar classes based primarily on the results of their CUNY Assessment Test in math.

Although the seminars tend to be quiet early in the day, orientation leaders turn them into bustling environments by leading the students in several icebreakers and games.

This allows them to get to know one another before the official start of their academic semester.

TEAM Baruch also offers positions to students as peer mentors in other departments and programs, such as the freshman seminar, Peers Advocating Wellness Services, the residence hall and Student Academic Consulting Center.

Students who are active within the Baruch community lead these programs and stay determined to make Baruch a positive experience for all.

Mentors who work at SACC help students out with resumes and internship searches while mentors in the residence hall make sure that the environment in the building is amiable and suits every resident.

Orientations and tours happen almost every day during the Summer and Winter sessions.

Students who wish to join TEAM Baruch and become a peer mentor may check in with Student Life at the end of September or the beginning of October to begin the application process and learn more about the program.

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