US must reconsider action in Yemen

Graphic+by+Joel+C.+BautistaAbbey+Road+was+first+released+in+1969+as+the+Beatles%27+eleventh+album+that+preceded+Let+It+Be+and+garnered+praise+for+its+experimenting+with+a+wide+array+of+genres.

Graphic by Joel C. BautistaAbbey Road was first released in 1969 as the Beatles’ eleventh album that preceded Let It Be and garnered praise for its experimenting with a wide array of genres.

The Editorial Board

The recent firing of former U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton comes to show that America is struggling to come to terms with the definition of foreign policy. 

With Trump’s heated rhetoric, it seems nearly impossible to stop his Twitter fingers from being vocal about foreign conflicts, such as the current war in Yemen. The U.S. Department of State’s official website states that “The U.S. government has provided more than $854 million in humanitarian assistance to Yemen since the beginning of fiscal year 2017,” which can explain why it would be out of the ordinary to stop now. However, with increasing tension in Yemen, it seems necessary that the U.S. government must consider how far things must go. 

Oftentimes, the current administration starts taking sides in foreign conflicts on Twitter before it truly considers whether America’s opinion or involvement of the conflict is necessary or relevant. 

The United States providing aid in Yemen is hurting rather than helping. In providing aid to the country and helping temporarily, involvement in the issue and grazing over the difficult parts is sending the country into ruins. Americans should not expect their country to extend a gracious helping hand to countries in need if the American government can’t even take charge of domestic issues properly.

The United States should consider the future of itself first. Sometimes, that’s the best way to help solve foreign conflicts.