Opinions

Loud music during club hours disrupts offices and class time

On the second floor during club hours on Thursdays, some clubs play music when they table on the second floor to attract students. Sometimes the music is played at such a volume that it can be heard from the fifth or sixth floor of the Newman Vertical Campus, which can be a nuisance to both students and faculty.

The Bearcat Den, adjacent to the Office of Student Life, is a place where students come to study or relax. On Thursdays, some people are forced to relocate to other areas due to loud music that may disturb students.

In office spaces, calls need to be made or received and paperwork needs to be filed. Under tranquil conditions, one is able to focus and productivity is enhanced. But loud music can have the opposite effect — it can reduce productivity and distracts people.

The Starr Career Development Center, also located on the second floor, is a space where students can receive help with formatting their resumes or finding their career path. Loud music may impede its staff from helping students, forcing both students and staff members to tune out the noise to the best of their abilities.

Throughout the NVC, small lounges are located alongside the stairs. The spatial design permits music played loud enough from the second floor to be heard from as high as the sixth floor. If the music can be heard from such a distance, it should be lowered. There is, without question, no valid reason as to why someone in the fifth or sixth floor bathroom should hear music being played from the second floor.

Loud music does more than create disturbances; it can also damage ears and bring along negative mental side effects. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, “Loud noise can create physical and psychological stress, reduce productivity, interfere with communication and concentration, and contribute to workplace accidents and injuries by making it difficult to hear warning signals.” These effects are important to address.

The main purpose of going to college is to earn a degree that allows students to secure a more prosperous future. Extracurricular activities are important and make for well-rounded students. But they should not distract or make it difficult for students and faculty members to be productive. Rather, they should enhance the college experience. Music, of course, can be played on the second floor to attract attention to our bustling club life, but clubs should be more considerate of others.

March 26, 2018

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