Opinions

Opinions

Humanitarian effort causes disarray

Perhaps it was just another blip on the 24-hour news cycle for the average viewer, another protest in the Middle East, flashing to frantic interviews subtitled in English. After the Arab Spring in 2011 and the rise of the Islamic State group, the U.S. viewing public will likely have drawn little attention to the incidents…

Billboards wrongly track consumers
Opinions

Billboards wrongly track consumers

There exists above us all a cloud, hazy and ephemeral, that follows our every move. Though far from sight, the cloud records our interests, activities and habits. Unknown to us, we consented to its stalking when the first Ethernet cable was plugged in. Consumer data tracking was an inevitable evolutionary trait of internet usage, an…

Opinions

Noted news outlets vie for readership

The New York Times feels the need to publicize its $14 million drop in print advertisement revenue, a sign that attention to physical newspapers is dwindling. Being a college newspaper, it is hard not to worry about the future of the physical newspaper. The aforementioned Times article makes a distinction that shows a trend in…

Opinions

Dhaka falls to extremists

Within the last month, Islamic extremists in Bangladesh have hacked to death a professor and an LGBT community organizer who worked for the U.S. Agency for International Development. These brutal murders tell the story of a society that is becoming more aggressive in pursuing its own interests and dismissive of constitutional authority. Asia’s fastest growing…

Opinions

City cannot tackle climate change alone

In an effort to make New York City more sustainable, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced a new plan to decrease greenhouse gas emissions from the city’s one million buildings. The announced strategy puts New York City at the forefront in the fight against climate change. The mayor’s decision to boost the city’s efforts to stop…

Opinions

Petty criminals see their voting rights restored

In Virginia and Maryland, former inmates are being granted the right to vote in November. In the former, 200,000 prisoners may be given the right to vote upon their release by the state as part of an initiative by Gov. Terry McAuliffe. As noted by The Washington Post, a quarter of all African-American men in…

Opinions

Awards to CUNY professors, students deserve recognition

As a public university system, CUNY tends to receive many hasty and unfair judgments. The city’s higher education system receives prejudiced criticisms from parents and incoming high school seniors vying for spots in some of the most acclaimed colleges and universities in the world. With high hopes for a bright college career, CUNY seems like…

Opinions

Nations prepare to halt global warming

Last December, Paris hosted the latest in a series of climate change summits. Though hopes for a binding commitment were high, expectations were paradoxically the lowest they have ever been. The hope was that the world’s leaders would realize the urgency of the global climate crisis and come up with far-reaching agreements on carbon emissions,…

Opinions

Politicker: Sanders retains no value in election

Although Bernie Sanders won Hillary Clinton in the most recent Indiana Primary, his victory only dominated by a few points. The number of delegates he received was insignificant because prior to the Indiana Primary, Sanders suffered a devastating defeat in the Acela Primary, further decreasing his chances of securing the nomination. New polls show even…

Goldman Sachs merits more penalty
Opinions

Goldman Sachs merits more penalty

After a financial scandal, Goldman Sachs paid a sum of money that was expected to erase its mistakes Goldman Sachs’ admission of guilt—an admission that should have led to prosecutions and mass shutdowns, not bailouts and safety from court—is a hollow one at this stage. The multinational investing firm is no stranger to internal scandal…

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